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Showing posts from March 30, 2011

THE ALPHABET SOUP OF G.A.P.S AND THE CERTIFICATION & AUDIT PROCESS

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International Mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, California


March 30, 2011


Any agricultural operation wishing to comply with the public's demand to know that the food supply is safe today has a very daunting challenge before them.


Starting in the 1990s, the food sector in all its forms from farming to harvest to processing or fresh through warehouses and on to the supermarkets and retailers began a very methodical analysis of safety in the entire food supply chain. Link by link the chain was examined and various bodies established guidelines or Standards and began marketing and promoting the various brands. The more commonly known depending upon geographic location, range from HACCP, ISO, SQF and what is known today as GLOBAL G.A.P..


The initial guidelines were very basic and overtime have taken on a life of their own. Much like software that starts out as a version 1.0 ending up at 4.0 overtime until a more effective product comes along.


Initially the Agricu…

FROM EUROPE G.A.P. TO GLOBAL G.A.P. (UNDERSTANDING THE PROCESS)

IMO NOTE: This is the background for a continuing series on the evolution of the G.A.P. Certification known today as GLOBAL G.A.P. (The standard by which all G.A.P.s are held to.)
Background:
What started in the late 1990s as a common agricultural standard drawn up by the European supermarket sector has now been confirmed as the most widely implemented farm certification scheme worldwide. EUREPGAP is now GLOBALGAP, a small but highly significant branding adjustment designed to reflect the metamorphosis of a once regional, continental system of checks into the leading manual for good farming practice.
Adoption of the standard outside Europe in parts of the world supplying EU markets has accelerated over the past few years thanks in part to the process known as benchmarking, which has given many countries the opportunity to develop their own agricultural quality procedures with equivalence to the GLOBALGAP standard, thereby allowing small-scale farmers to achieve the certification.

GLOBAL G.A.P. RESPONSE TO IMO BLOG POSTINGS IN RECENT DAYS

IMO NOTE: GLOBAL G.A.P. OFFICIAL RESPONSE TO RECENT ARTICLES POSTED ON THE IMO BLOG SITE.


As a follow up to research conducted by the IMO, The Managing Director of GLOBAL G.A.P., Dr. Kristian Moeller was contacted and he very graciously agreed to clear up some of the confusion about GRASP component of GLOBAL G.A.P.


Here is the clarification:




Dear Will,

Kristian Moeller asked that i respond to the blog posting.. i wanted to post on the blog, but i could not find where i could do that directly.

Here is a response that you may post there. 

OXFAM: MEASURING CORPORATIONS POVERTY FOOT PRINT

Poverty FootprintToday, the value of global business in developing countries far exceeds that of development assistance, creating an opportunity for the private sector to use its resources and influence to address global social and economic challenges. Understanding the complex relationship between industry and poverty can lead to more visible value chains, better businesses, and improved communities.



8TH ANNUAL IFEX PHILIPPINES (INTERNATIONAL FOOD EXHIBIT)

Celebrate the flavors of the world and unlock an exciting array of food finds that cater to the global palate at the 8th IFEX Philippines! Feast your taste buds and sample more than the usual fare of savory culinary pleasures in this top-of-the-line food event where food and sourcing are turned into an entirely superb experience.

PHILIPPINES: IMPORTANT TRADE SHOW FOR MANGO INDUSTRY IN MAY

Food exporters working to have a bigger slice of world market 
By Abigail L. Ho
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 23:22:00 03/30/2011

Filed Under: Food, International (Foreign)Trade




Most Read MANILA, Philippines—More than 400 local and foreign food manufacturers, including some of the country's biggest brands, are coming together in mid-May to help the Philippines capture a bigger chunk of the ever-growing processed food market.


The 8th International Food Exhibition (Ifex) Philippines will bring together various manufacturers and industry groups to showcase what the country had to offer in terms of edibles.


According to Rosvi Gaetos, executive director of the Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions, Ifex Philippines will be a good venue to reel in new buyers, including some of the largest retailers in the world.

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN ACTION: THE BROETJE ORCHARDS EXAMPLE

IMO NOTE: If you think this is a joke...think again...Broetje Orchards farms 5,000 acres in Washington State and makes the time to address this very important issue.


Broetje Orchards is unique in the apple growing and packing industry because we are founded on the belief that faith and business can be incorporated in a single mission.

USDA APHIS IRRADIATION UPDATE (March 30, 2011)

IMO NOTE: The IMO is grateful to the prompt response from USDA APHIS Official Michon Oubichon regarding protocol issues:


March 30, 2011


Hi Will,

Mangos from Mexico are only allowed to make entry into the US if they are treated in the country of origin with either irradiation, or hot water treatment, or forced air treatment or vapor heat under a Preclearance program.  USDA-APHIS-PPQ has formal agreements with Mexico to only allow treatments in the country of origin only. 

Here is specific information for Mangos from Mexico to US:

https://epermits.aphis.usda.gov/manual/index.cfm?action=cirReportP&PERMITTED_ID=10595761


Untreated Mangos may only transit through the US to Canada.  All of the requirements stated on the transit permit must be met.  The transit conditions specifically stated on the permit due not allow untreated Mangos from Mexico to be treated in the United States.

Please reference the Manual for Agriculture Clearance (link below) and the Transit Conditions Overland document fo…

PHOTO JOURNALISTS NEEDED FOR IMO BLOG

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International  Mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, California


March 30, 2011


Please help improve the interaction on our Blog!


They say that "a picture is worth 1,000 words", would you please join forces with the IMO and send us pictures of mango related topics in a jpeg format so that we can publish and share with th entire Global Mango Community.


Topics of interest are:


 Mango Groves around the world at various stages of pre, harvest and post harvest.


Mango Packing Operations.


Product in Box at various markets around the world.


Pictures from Festivals, symposiums and mango themed events around the world.


Thank you for your continued support and for making the IMO BLOG your # 1 source for the GLOBAL MANGO COMMUNITY


INSPECCION MASIVA EN MEXICO A RAIZ DEL BROTE DEL DRAGON AMARILLO

México: Inspeccionan frutas en mercados

Operativos de inspección y vigilancia sanitaria en contra de grandes distribuidores de fruta se emprendió por parte de la Jefatura de Sanidad Vegetal Federal en los mercados y tiendas de auto-servicio para evitar la venta de productos contaminados o bien con presencia de plagas que pudieran desestabilizar el estatus sanitario en Tamaulipas.

De igual manera se aplican procedimientos en contra de aquellas empresas que cuentan con productos contaminados y que no presentan documentos oficiales donde se establece la entrada legal de la fruta a tierras tamaulipecas.



EL PAPEL CLAVE DEL F.D.A. EN LAS IMPORTACIONES A USA

FDA
Principales razones por rechazos de importaciones a los Estados Unidos

Los productos frescos de America Latina que ingresan a los EU vienen principalmente de México, Guatemala, Chile, Republica Dominicana, Costa Rica, Perú, Honduras, Ecuador y Colombia.


Los Principales rechazos de productos que iban a ser importados a EU en el 2010 fueron por mal uso de plaguicidas, etiquetado y por contaminación microbiana.


 En la FDA han podido ver un aumento en la contaminación microbiana la cual es causada por agua de riego que se encuentran contaminadas o por un mal manejo de las frutas y hortalizas frescas en el almacenamiento o empaque.

FLAVOR CERTIFICATION FOR GROWER / SHIPPERS

Flavor Services for Growers/Shippers







ResourcesBrochuresFlavor Management and CertificationSensory Testing & Flavor MappingShop SCS for Sustainability-Safety-Certification

Growers and shippers optimize the flavor of their products through careful production and handling practices.


 SCS Flavor Management services help growers/shippers:
Analyze the factors that affect flavor characteristics of targeted products: growing, harvesting, conditioning, storage, and shipping.Identify seed varieties and breeds that offer the best flavor potential.Formulate and execute a Flavor Management Plan.Determine if specific crops qualify for SCS’s Certified Flavor Rich™ program.


HOT WATER DAMAGE IN MANGO

PHOTO OF HOT WATER DAMAGED FRUIT:
The damage is not visible from the outside....fruit looks perfect...only an intensive inspection can detect it because fruit is picked so immature for the HWT process...Is it fair to subject the consumer to this lottery?


FLAVOR DEBATE: CERTIFICATION AVAILABLE TO PROVE IT

Sensory Evaluation and Testing


ResourcesBrochuresFlavor Management and CertificationSensory Testing & Flavor MappingShop SCS for Sustainability-Safety-Certification
Good flavor is decidedly one of the most important factors driving fresh produce sales.
 Delivering high quality flavor, however, is a complex process that depends on seed variety, farming practices, maturity at harvest and post-harvest handling. Companies that can deliver on the promise of flavor stand to be rewarded.
Under its Flavor Management and Certified Flavor Rich™ programs, SCS combines the latest discoveries in flavor research, direct sensory evaluation, and chemical/physical product analysis to help

THE CHAIN OF CUSTODY ISSUE: AN EXAMPLE IN ANOTHER INDUSTRY

FSC Chain of Custody Certification ResourcesBrochuresChain of Custody Certification ManualChain of Custody for Print IndustryChain of Custody for Wood ProductsChain of Custody Group Certification Standards SCS currently has 2,358 FSC Chain of Custody certificates.
The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an international certification system that recognizes the highest levels of environmentally and socially responsible forest management
FSC certification is a voluntary, market-based system that allows companies to promote their products as deriving from well-managed forests.

ISSUES REGARDING EBEAM PROTOCOL MAYBE INVOLVED IN DELAY OF PAKI MANGO TO USA MARKET

A phone call this morning from a USDA APHIS Official to the IMO explained that the current protocol for irradiated fruit requires treatment at source point i.e.- Country of origin.
Any exception to this rule must be requested by the country of origin Government Officials.
The official promised to put the communication in an email which will be posted once it is received by IMO.
An email from the ebeam facility director at Texas A & M University (TAMU) shed further light on the issue:

CLARIFICATION ON RECENT GLOBAL G.A.P. ARTICLE BY IMO

March 30, 2011


Contact IMO: imango.org@gmail.com


IMO NOTE: The recent blogs on the GLOBAL G.A.P. compliance issue of the GRASP component and the light that NGOs SOMO and AAI have focused on weakness in the Peru labor situation, were meant to shed light on the importance of Social Responsibility and Sustainability initiatives in the Global Mango Community.


The IMO apologizes if the articles were misunderstood as a criticism of GLOBAL G.A.P.


The articles was intended to ask the age old question: Who audits the auditors (ie COMPLIANCE)?


Yesterday, the IMO spoke with Dr. Kristian Moeller about the GRASP component and he explained that currently GRASP is not available for Peruvian exporters. (The IMO assumes that is because Peru labor standard does not meet that of other countries)

VIEWER COMMENTS: CHUY LOZA, FRESKA PRODUCE

IMO NOTE: It appears that recent reporting by IMO on the question of who enforces compliance and the lack thereof of the various G.A.P. programs around the world hit a nerve with Mr. Loza....


Will;


I really do not have the time to micro-analyze our industry. 
I believe in general terms of providing a decent product, at a decent price, with good traceability food safety programs in place. Aside from this, not really sure of your motivation to “lead” us. 
Being that until recently, I did not know of you…….
Like I have told you, YOU are only telling one side of story

And YOU can quote me on this!


Chuy Loza Freska Produce Int. LLC Tel 805-650-1040 Fax 805-650-3550 www.freskaproduce.com


FARM WORKER SALARIES IN PERU ARE HALF OF THOSE IN CHILE

March 30, 2011


Peruvian Institute for agrarian reform, COPERAGRO has released data that shows that Farm workers in that country today earn $15.00 (usd.) per day versus double that amount in Chile.


This differential in salary is due to Chile's historical boom in agricultural exports and the local shortage of workers to supply labor.

FARMERS PROTEST LACK OF GOVERNMENT SUPPORT IN FROST AFFECTED MANGO REGION IN MEXICO

March 30th, 2011 Farmers and their tractors converged on the Sinaloa State Government Palace in Mexico for the last two days, demanding financial assistance following crop-damaging frosts in February, reported Noroeste.com.mx. Around 450 growers were demanding US$836 (10,000 Mexican pesos) per hectare in a peaceful protest to resolve difficult credit situations with the autumn-winter agricultural cycle, the story reported. The strike was attended by Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries Juan Guerra Ochoa, who offered to arrange support of US$418 (5,000 Mexican pesos) per hectare.

MANGO TREES THAT BEAR FRUIT IN FOUR YEARS DEVELOPED IN KENYA

March 30th, 2011 High yielding bananas, fast maturing mangoes and plumper passion fruit are just some new fruit breeds the Kenyan Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) has developed.  Breakthrough technology has improved the horticultural crops of many Kenyan farmers, but there is still not enough supply to meet demand for new seed, reported Nairobistar.com. The institute has produced many innovative seeds that are not yet available to farmers, for products such as table grapes, macadamia nuts, avocadoes, pawpaw, apples and mangoes that mature in less than four years rather than 10 years, the story reported.