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THE WORLD'S ABILITY TO GROW ENOUGH FOOD FOR SURVIVAL IS BEING THREATENED BY LOSS OF GENETIC VARIETIES

These Algerian palms mean much more than food alone: But species are at risk everywhere
By Environment Correspondent Alex Kirby



Conservationists in the US say the world is losing plant species at a rate which threatens its ability to grow enough food, and to exploit other plant-based products on which hundreds of millions of people depend.


A report by the Worldwatch Institute, based in Washington DC, says the genetic diversity of the plants humanity relies on is being eroded at a dangerous rate.


The report, "Nature's Cornucopia: Our Stake in Plant Diversity", says widespread loss of species and varieties is attacking the foundations of agricultural productivity.


The report's author, Dr John Tuxill, said: "The genetic diversity of cultivated plants is essential to breeding more productive and disease-resistant crop varieties".




http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/449096.stm










CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT PREDICTS THAT FOOD SUPPLY WILL BE SEVERLEY AFFECTED

Areas where food supplies could be worst hit by climate change have been identified in a report. Some areas in the tropics face famine because of failing food production, an international research group says. The Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) predicts large parts of South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa will be worst affected. Its report points out that hundreds of millions of people in these regions are already experiencing a food crisis. "We are starting to see much more clearly where the effects of climate change on agriculture could intensify hunger and poverty," said Patti Kristjanson, an agricultural economist with the CCAFS initiative that produced the report.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13628374?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter



WHAT MAKES THE CURRENT E. COLI OUTBREAK SO MUCH MORE DEADLY THAN ALL OF THE REST...AND WHY NO ONE IS SAFE...

E. coli that has sickened thousands in Europe has become the deadliest outbreak of the bacteria on record as a rare strain is causingkidney failure in unprecedented numbers, U.S. health officials said. At least 16 people have died and 1,624 cases have been reported, according to the World Health Organization in Geneva. The number of reported cases is based on hospital records, and the actual number of infections may be 10 or more times higher, said Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. The strain circulating in Germany and nine other European countries has caused kidney damage, a rare symptom of E. coli, in 100 times more cases than the biggest U.S. outbreak of the bacteria. That occurred in tainted meat at the Jack in the Box fast-food chain in 1993, said Robert Tauxe, deputy director of food-borne illnesses at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Germany alone has reported 470 cas…

AN INTERVIEW WITH THE INCOMING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE NEW YORK TIMES NEWSPAPER AND THE FUTURE OF ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST PRINT MEDIA EMPIRES

Jill Abramson, the next executive editor of The New York Times, and Bill Keller, who's stepping down in September after eight years, talked Thursday about the state of the paper and what's ahead. Ms. Abramson focused on digital operations last year and found more than a couple ways it had to improve. Advertising Age: What did you learn during your six-month stint last year diving deep into the online side? Was anything surprising? Jill Abramson: It was somewhat surprising, but not completely surprising, is that although we felt we had integrated our newsroom, there was still basically something that everyone here called the web newsroom.  The more I submerged into the web newsroom, I was some combination of surprised or worried that Bill and I were not really invested enough in the direction and news rhythm of our digital news report. One thing I tried during the six months was to only read online.  As I read more and more early in the morning I felt like everyone else was playing t…

INDIA LOVE AFFAIR WITH THE MANGO ENDS BEFORE IT COULD BEGIN, AS WEATHER DENIES LOVERS EMBRACE...

NEW DELHI: The thunderstorms and squalls in north India that brought relief from the scorching summer heat in May will not be remembered fondly by mango lovers. 


Strong wind speeds of over 50kmph spelt doom for the region's mango crop. 


Several thousand tonnes of the fruit were destroyed in the stormy weather and as a consequence Delhi has already started witnessing of high prices and supply shortage of mangoes.

Against an average of 100-odd trucks a day, the capital is getting fewer than 20 trucks these days. 


On Friday, 13 trucks came into the market from Lucknow, a number that went up only slightly on Saturday to 17 and to about 20 on Monday. 


A truck carries an average of 48 tonnes of the fruit.




http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/Squalls-spoil-the-mango-lovers-party/articleshow/8701026.cms

INDIA: CUSTOMERS TIRED OF ARTIFICIALLY RIPENED MANGOES DEMAND ORGANIC FRUIT

BANGALORE: With lower prices and higher production, this mango season is surely special. Consumers have the option to avoid the fruit artificially ripened with calcium carbide, a ratherharmful chemical. In fact, organic mangoes are selling big time in the city.

The health department of Chennai corporation recently seized 11.5 tonnes of artificially ripened mangoes and confiscated them because of their harmful health impact. Most fruit dealers inBangalore, too, use the same chemical before pushing them to markets. 


A number of organic companies is making a killing this year as more people are becoming aware of artificial ripening. "Organic mangoes have become popular in the past three years. The demand is high because people want to avoid chemicals. Neither do we use carbide nor do we store mangoes in warm places to ripen them. They are plucked from trees only when they are ripe enough," said a salesperson from Pristine Organics. 


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bangalo…

FACTORY BRINGS HOPE TO HUMBLE MANGO FARMERS IN KENYA

During December and March, there is literally a mango galore in Ukambani. 


This used to be a nightmare for farmers who had nowhere to take to. Traders from all over the country converge in the region but they were still overwhelmed by the volumes of the crop that a lot of it went to waste.


During this period, farmers ask teachers to let their students to their plots to eat the surplus lest they rot. This however changed, much to the farmers' relief, when a mango factory was built last year.



Chuluni Fruits Processing Plant is a community initiative supported by Arid Lands Resource Management project. The factory is about 15km south of Kitui town. The factory is a big relief to local mango farmers who sell their produce at the factory.




The factory is involved in buying, processing and packaging of the mango juice which is sold in the local markets and even outside Kitui. 


The Chuluni initiative brings together 44 members out of which 18 are women.


 All of them are mango farmers.


To be a me…

CLIMATE CHANGE IS NOTHING NEW: MANKIND HAS BEEN ADAPTING FOR AGES AND WILL CONTINUE TO DO SO

The Norse came to a new land around the end of the first millennium, borne on the backs of their Viking long ships and lured away from Iceland by the promise of Erik the Red's Greenland.


 The land was indeed green when they landed—and stayed that way for several centuries until natural variations in the planet's climate cooled the world's largest island by 4 degrees Celsius.


 Years of such cool summers doomed the Greenland Norse, and their outpost froze to death by 1500.

The Norse "were primarily farmers who relied on the summer hay production to feed their livestock through the long Greenland winter," says geologist William D'Andrea at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who presented new confirmation of this cooling and starving scenario in the May 30 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


 "If summers got shorter and/or colder than the Norse were used to and their hay production was not able to meet their demands—and if this happe…

THE GATES FOUNDATION: FIGHTING TO SAVES CHILDREN'S LIVES IN AFRICA

IMO NOTE: MOZAMBIQUE, FORMER COLONY OF PORTUGAL (East Africa) one of the first places Indian mangoes touched on the African continent in theLate 1400s &  early 1500s.
To Save the Children, UK “Mummy Blogger” Journeys to Africa



I'm not sure I will adequately explain how I feel about travelling to Mozambique. 


I have been to several southern African countries before, but never Mozambique.







I must say firstly: I absolutely LOVE Africa.


 It is a wonderful place of vast open spaces, dramatic scenery and huge skies. 


There is no place on Earth that compares with the feeling of being here. 


I am reminded so clearly of how I felt when I was here last, with my son Harry, when he was just nine.


 He too was touched by the spirit of Africa and, like me, is determined to return one day.


 I once described Africa as somewhere that makes you feel as though you have left a part of yourself there and it calls you, constantly to return. 


Well, here I am, but this trip will be like no other.


Mozambique is a …

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN EXPLAINS THE NEW DIETARY GUIDELINES SET BY USDA

Gone will be the massive base slab of breads, pasta and grains—and the suggestive "sparing" point of sweets and fats—of the 1990s. Gone also will be the confounding rainbow-striped "MyPyramid" with its online personal food plans introduced in 2005 during the George W. Bush administration. In their place will be a new circular chart to depict the government's recommended model for American meals.

The revelation is, of course, not one of geometry but one of proportions. In the new U.S. dietary model, fruits and vegetables are taking center stage, likely comprising a good half of the picture.


http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=usda-food-plate&WT.mc_id=SA_DD_20110602



GIORGIO CECIARELLI ( G.C. IMPORTS ) RESURFACES IN TORONTO AFTER 20 YEAR ABSCENCE

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LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE PERUVIAN DISASTER: THE 2010-2011 MANGO SEASON

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International Mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, California


June 02, 2011




A recent publication by APEM, Peru's mango exporter association, admits what the whole world already knows; Poor planning = accident.


The obvious conclusion is that Peru & Mexico collided in the USA market and depressed prices.


This was a result of fictitious crop estimates and shipping projections on the part of the Peruvians. 


To project 7 million cartons and to actually ship 12 million can only end up with a bad result. 


There is NO excuse for such a gaff.


It would have been better off in the long run to have"dumped" mangoes in Peru than to ship and lose money on all of the value added.


The USA importers share some of the blame here as well. Why didn't the NMB put out stop signs???


The Peruvians would have been far better off over estimating the production and scaring Mexican shippers into holding off than to leave the door open for Mexico (with a much lower cost struct…

SUDAN: WILL THEY EVER KNOW PEACE AS AN INDEPENDENT NATION ?

Sudan: What’s next for Abyei?As humanitarian organizations and the UN strive to meet the immediate needs of displaced people, Oxfam is calling on the UN Security Council to ensure that the new peacekeeping mission in Sudan makes protecting civilians from violence its top priority. May 31st, 2011 | by Guest Blogger This blog was written by Noah Gottschalk, Senior policy advisor for humanitarian response Tensions are running high in Sudan, where an upsurge in violence in the border region of Abyei has displaced tens of thousands of people and raised fears of a return to all-out war. With just over six weeks to go before South Sudan becomes the world’s newest country, the world’s focus has largely been on the incredible accomplishments of the largely peaceful referendum held last January to determine the future of Sudan.
 The results of that vote, which was a key provision of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) that ended more than two decades of conflict, were overwhelmingly for sec…

A VER SI PERU APRENDIO ALGUNA LECCION DEL DESASTRE DE LA TEMPORADA PASADA DE MANGO.....

El mayor problema en Peru es una falta de consumo interno para sus productos agricolas....resuelto esto no tendran hamas nunca problemas de saturacion de Mercados de exportacion.......


Nota del IMO/OIM:
Hay dos observaciones: 1.- las Proyecciones no sirvieron y 2.- Cuando Mexico viene...viene con ganas de arrazar




Perú: Mangueros califican como desastrosa la campaña pasada

Muchos de los exportadores de mango, califican la campaña pasada, como desastrosa, pues los resultados económicos así lo demuestran. 


En total se exportaron alrededor de 31, 726,418 cajas (5,723 contenedores) a los mercados de EEUU, Europa y otros (Canadá, Rusia, Japón, China, Chile, Etc.)

El problema se presenta a partir de la semana 02 y se extiende hasta la semana 8 (2011) donde hay sobreoferta del producto y los precios caen a niveles donde el exportador pierde, pues los gastos de operación en origen sumados a los de destino superan a la venta de la fruta.





La campaña que paso no hubo presencia de lluvias durante la …

RUSSIA HALTS VEGETABLE IMPORTS FROM ALL OF EU UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Europe argues over killer bacteria
Russia bans European vegetable imports

Russia banned European vegetable imports on Thursday as Britain reported an outbreak of the mysterious lethal bacteria that has killed 18, mainly in Germany, and Spain demanded a payback for its farmers.

German authorities have failed to pinpoint the origin of the outbreak, which has infected more than 2000 people in the past month and dealt a blow to the European farm sector amid official warnings to avoid raw vegetables.

As confusion reigned over the killer strain of E. coli bacteria, Russia said it had blacklisted imports of fresh vegetables from European Union countries with immediate effect and slammed food safety standards in the bloc.

Meanwhile Britain said seven people there had been infected with the bacteria, including three British nationals who had recently travelled to Germany and four German nationals.

Russia's Rospotrebnadzor watchdog said its ban would remain in force until the EU explained wh…

U.K. RETAIL: HEAD OF MORRISONS HANDED MILLION POUND INCENTIVE TO STAY ON BOARD

Richard Pennycook was handed a million-pound sweetener by Morrisons in a bid by the supermarket to hang on to its highly prized finance director.
Shares worth £1.25m were given to Pennycook in March, the supermarket’s annual report shows. 
The payment is dependent on Pennycook staying with Morrisons for the next years.
The company said in its report that it "considered it essential to secure Richard Pennycook's services as group finance director" in the wake of Marc Bolland’s defection to Marks & Spencer.
“While this is an unusual arrangement, the [remuneration] committee considers that the granting of this award is in the long-term interest of shareholders and is satisfied that it is appropriate.”

Pennycook was initially tipped to follow Bolland to M&S and has since been touted a contender for a number of other senior roles in retail.


http://www.thegrocer.co.uk//Articles.aspx?page=articles&ID=218498