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ONLY IN MONTE CARLO....$1 MILLION DOLLAR FENDER BENDER...AS DITZY DRIVER...CRASHES LUXURY CARS...

Oops, it's a £700,000 prang... Hapless blonde crashes her Bentley into a Merc, Porsche, Ferrari and Aston Martin

By LEE MORAN


Last updated at 2:22 AM on 28th July 2011



When in Monte Carlo, everything is done in style. And that includes crashing your car.

This was the moment when a woman driver caused a £700,000 five-car pile-up as her Bentley collided with a Mercedes, Ferrari, Porsche and Aston Martin.

Disaster struck as the hapless blonde negotiated the traffic around the Place du Casino in her £250,000 Bentley Azure.

The driver of a white Mercedes S Class worth £75,000 was the first victim as the 2.7-ton Bentley scraped down the side of it before ploughing into a £143,000 black Ferrari F430.



Hope you're insured, madam: A policeman tries to sort out the chaos beside Monte Carlo's Place du Casino

An Aston Martin Rapide worth £150,000 and an £80,000 Porsche 911 also came a cropper. The driver and her two passengers then suffered the embarrassment of being surrounded by to…

YO DIRIA QUE MAS.....PERO...LA FISCAL DE LA NACION EN COLOMBIA DICE QUE SOLO 8 MIL MILLIONES DE DOLARES AL AñO SE DEBE AL LAVADO DE DOLARES....OSEA...EL 3% DEL PIB DE COLOMBIA...

Publicado: 2011-07-28T16:30:00

Calculan en US$8.000 millones el lavado de dinero anual en Colombia


Foto: Archivo Semana
Viviane Morales, Fiscal General de la Nación.
Esta cifra procede de actividades ilegales son lavados anualmente en Colombia, sostuvo la fiscal general, Viviane Morales.





La funcionaria explicó que la cifra se corresponde con cálculos de la Unidad de Información y Análisis Financiero (Uiaf, del Ministerio de Hacienda), que es el órgano responsable en Colombia de la lucha contra el blanqueo de capitales.


El lavado ha tomado en Colombia "un ritmo bastante acelerado", admitió la fiscal al inaugurar en Cartagena el XI Congreso Panamericano de Riesgo de Lavado de Activos y Financiación del Terrorismo.


La cita, que irá hasta mañana, reúne a representantes del sector bancario y de la lucha mundial contra el problema en el continente, por convocatoria de la Asociación Bancaria y de Entidades Financieras de Colombia (Asobancaria).


"Solo para hacernos una idea de las …

WHILE LEGAL EXPORTS OF MANGO REMAIN "STAGNANT"...ILLEGAL EXPORTS FROM PAKISTAN TO IRAN & AFGHANISTAN ARE INCREASING 30% PER ANUM...

Friday, July 29, 2011


Mango export expected to remain stagnant



KARACHI: Pakistan’s mango export is likely to remain stagnant ranging between 75,000 metric tonnes to 80,000 metric tonnes this season despite the fact that Japan and US have lifted the ban on import of Pakistani mangoes.

It may be recalled here that previous year Pakistan had exported the similar volume of mango to traditional countries which always prefer to buy Pakistani fruit including Denmark, UK, France, Singapore, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Kuwait, UAE and Sweden. 





During the previous year, mango export continued to remain stagnant ranging between 75,000 to 85,000 metric tonnes. 


The only exception was in the year 2007 when it peaked to 110,000 tonnes and since then gradual decline in its demand is reflective from lack of marketing strategy followed by exporters of one of the most demanding fruit of the summer season. 




Ironically, annual mango yield usually reaches at around two million tonnes in the country out of w…

POSADA "LA BONITA"...RIO GRANDE DO NORTE...BRASIL....LIFE IS GOOD...

Paradise has a name and address......


http://www.pousadalabonita.com/















NAPLES, FLORIDA NEWS TALKS MANGOES...AND OTHER SOUTH FLORIDA FRUITS THAT GROW IN BACKYARDS...

What would be better than eating those “Yankee fruits” you remember from up North? The answer is simple: growing and eating them down here, that’s what — peaches and plums and blackberries, right here in Naples, along with dozens of less-famous tropical fruits that make your garden enviable.

Last weekend, the Collier County Extension Office sponsored a three-hour fruit tree workshop, as part of its policy encouraging Floridians to move away from reliance on citrus. Collier County Extension Service Commercial Horticulture Agent Doug Caldwell — “Dr. Dougbug,” as he is known — populated the guest list with heavyweights from across the state. Bob Rouse is an fruit tree experimenter at the Immokalee Research Station, of the Extension Service. Buddy Hopkins, owner of Hopkins Tropical Fruit Tree Nursery, 25355 Shultz Grade, Immokalee, has a deep horticultural knowledge. Jenny and David Burd, owners of the Friendly Burd Tree Service in Naples, speak from decades of local experience.

They off…

USDA AGENCIES CONTRIBUTE SURPLUS CROPS TO FEED THE NEEDY...

Feds Fighting Hunger One Mango at a Time

Posted by Katie Yocum, Rural Development Northeast Region Coordinator, on July 28, 2011 at 10:11 AM


State Executive Director Charles Cawley of Maryland donated over 2,000 lbs of sweet corn to “Feds Feed Families.”


Right now, federal employees across the country are banding together to support the “Feds Feed Families” food drive. We’re nearing the end of July, and while the reports coming in look promising, we need to keep pushing ahead. August is right around the corner, which means we only have one more month to reach our USDA goal of 500,000 pounds of healthful canned goods and fresh produce.


We have a long way to go to hit our goal, so I want to provide some inspiration, using some fantastic examples from our USDA colleagues in the field.


In Maryland, our Farm Service Agency State Executive Director Charles Cawley and his daughter Amy spent four hours picking sweet corn. 

 They ended up donating 2,235 pounds of sweet corn to the Maryland Food Ban…

A CHEERY NOTE FROM THE NATIONAL MANGO BOARD (NMB) AND COMMENTS BY THE IMO...

This email was sent to you by The National Mango Board. Please add
mango_news@email.mango.org to your address book or safe list to ensure
delivery to your inbox.

If you do not see this message in the proper format, please view a copy here.

Volume 6 | Issue 7 | July 2011
en español

Dear Will,

Many of you may be aware that FDA has increased their random inspections of mangos at the border. Although it can be a real inconvenience and sometimes keep fruit from getting to the market in a timely manner, it is encouraging that the inspections have not yielded any significant findings. It is also good to hear that the Fresh Produce Association of the Americas (FPAA) is working to address importers' concerns with FDA in an effort to streamline the process.

 Mangos continue to inspire me, especially with all the experiences they go through to get to the market here in the U.S. The increase in imports this year is a testament to the good work everyone along the mango distribution chain does. 
(Th…

AS THE WORLD LEARNS OF THE GRAVITY OF THE SITUATION IN AFRICA...THE FOUR BIGGEST OBSTACLES ARE IDENTIFIED...

Four reasons help is slow to reach Somalia’s famine victims



As more information about East Africa’s famine reaches Western audiences, the situation looks increasingly grim – but aid doesn’t seem to be keeping pace with the publicity. What challenges do humanitarian organizations face?
- Ariel Zirulnick, Staff writer







In this Jan. 1, 2010 photo, a young boy leads the hard-line Islamist Al Shabab fighters as they conduct military exercise in northern Mogadishu's Suqaholaha neighborhood, Somalia. (Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP/File)




1. Al Shabab

Al Shabab militants say it is better to starve than to accept aid from the West. With their threats and attacks, Al Shabab may be intentionally keeping Somalis out of reach of Western aid, or killing them for attempting to escape the famine, the Associated Press reports.

The United Nations World Food Programmesays there are 2.2. million people in need of aid who are out of reach in militant-controlled southern Somalia.

Al Shabab initially said it would allo…

THE SOUTHERN BRANCH IN PERU OF THE INTER OCEANIC HIGHWAY...

A TRIP THROUGH THE "TRANS OCEANIC" HIGHWAY...UNEARTHS MANY SECRETS...AND CREATES A NEW WORLD ORDER IN THE HEART OF SOUTH AMERICA...

Peru's new highway to the future


The Interoceanic Highway, which will connect Peru's Pacific coast to the shores of the Atlantic in Brazil, could revolutionize the region much as the transcontinental railroad did in the US in 1869.




A twisting road leads to Marcapata, a village on Peru’s Interoceanic Highway. The highway, set to be completed in the coming weeks, will cut across Brazil and Peru to connect the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

Steven Bodzin


By Steven Bodzin, Correspondent /                                                                                                June 25, 2011
Puerto Maldonado, Peru

Traveling from Brazil’s Atlantic coast to Assis, on the border with Peru deep in the Amazon, took Raul Pereira weeks over a precarious dirt road in 1974. The trip required machetes.




Today, his house and workshop are on a paved road. “This was an animal trail in those days," he says.



For years, Assis was the end of the road. 

Traveling on through the Peruvian Amazon and ove…