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FIRST PAKISTANI MANGOES IMPORTED INTO USA RECEIVE DIPLOMATIC ESCORT FROM CHICAGO O'HARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TO SADEX IRRADIATION FACILITY IN IOWA AND BACK TO THE HILTON HOTEL IN CHICAGO FOR MANGO CELEBRATION...FIRST CONSIGNMENT ARE A SPECIAL GIFT FROM THE PEOPLE OF PAKISTAN TO USA...

Both sweet and symbolic, Pakistani mangoes to arrive in Chicago



by Odette Yousef Jul. 29, 2011
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(Wikimedia Commons/Jahanzaib Zai)

Chaunsa mangoes.





Pakistanis who’ve longed for easy access to their country’s most prized fruit will likely be able to find their favored mangoes on supermarket shelves in Chicago soon. 

This week the first shipment of Pakistani mangoes, all of the sweet chaunsa variety, arrived in Chicago. 

It will be feted tomorrow at a mango celebration at Chicago’s Palmer House Hotel, by no less than the Pakistan Ambassador to the US and other invited guests.




“The most important thing for people to realize (is) that this is an unprecedented situation,” said Asad Hayauddin, Consul for Trade and Commerce at the Consulate General of Pakistan in Chicago. 

Hayauddin began working closely with US and Pakistani officials three years ago to figure out how to satisfy regulations set by the US Department of Agriculture that had long kept the fruits from reaching the US …

MANGO FARMERS IN KENYA ENJOY SUPPORT FROM MAJOR SPONSORS...WITH COCA-COLA JUICE VENTURE..

Fruit farmers squeeze cash from Coca Cola


By WINSLEY MASESE, wmasese@ke.nationmedia.com
Posted Friday, July 29 2011 at 23:36





Fruit farmers in parts of Rift Valley and Central Kenya contracted by a multinational firm, earned Sh150 million in 2010 from their deliveries.


This was part Coca Cola company’s strategy to expand and consolidate its new juice market share.





Lionel Marumahoko, the company’s general manager for still beverages in East and Central Africa, said that this would see a reduction of losses farmers incur as a result of wastage.


“This change will deliver significant cost efficiencies as well as enhance our responsiveness to ever changing consumer taste needs,” he said.


The company imports the raw materials that go into making the different varieties of juice.


Becoming the hub


Under Project Nurture, the company contracts local farmers to provide raw materials with each region with strengths in the production of a given product becoming the hub.



Mr Marumahoko said it would make it…

NATIONAL PRESS CLUB (NPC) TO SPONSOR MANGO CELEBRATION IN ISLAMABAD...FAMILY THEMED ENTERTAINMENT TO CELEBRATE THE KING OF FRUITS...

NPC holds ‘Mango Party’ today

Saturday, July 30, 2011





Islamabad: The National Press Club (NPC), Islamabad, will organise a ‘Mango Party and Grand Entertainment Show’ today (Saturday) at the Lok Virsa. 




Federal Minister for Information and Broadcasting Dr. Firdous Ashiq Awan (IMAGE) will be the chief guest on the occasion, says a press release issued here on Friday.








The event will start at 2 p.m. and continue till 12 midnight. Games, magic shows and puppet shows will be part of the programme to keep the interest of children alive.




Moreover, well-known artistes Laila Zubairi (IMAGE), Awais Niazi, Masood Khwaja, Chand Bral, Shan Khan Mehsud, Saira Arshad and Malku will perform in the show. 












The famous poet, Dr. Inaam-ul-Haq Javed (IMAGE), will read his poetry on the current situation in the country.

IRRADIATION PROGRESS OPENS DOORS FOR AUSTRALIAN MANGO EXPORTERS...USA MARKET IS ON TRACK FOR 2012...

Sweet deal: Joe Moro is hopeful Tableland mangoes will be sold in the US marketplace. Picture: KYLIE REGHENZANI






Tableland hopes to crack US mango market

Tony Stickley

Saturday, July 30, 2011

© The Cairns Post













TABLELAND mango growers are hoping for a boost in sales when Australia and the US sign an agreement on access for the fruit, possibly later this year.




Mareeba Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association president Joe Moro said negotiations were under way between Australian Biosecurity and US authorities.




There are more than 200 mango orchards on the Tableland producing $30 million worth of fruit.




Mr Moro said growers hoped to repeat their success in selling mangoes to the New Zealand market.




For many years, Australian mangoes were banned in the NZ because metal bromide was used to preserve the fruit.




About six years ago they regained access using irradiation instead, though there was still resistance with the two main supermarket chains refusing to stock the fruit for a time. But Mr Moro said …

BIO FUEL POLICY HAS PLUNDERED MAN'S ABILITY TO FEED HIMSELF...

Getting used to Life without Food
Wall Street, BP, bio-ethanol and the death of millions

by F. William Engdahl









Agribusiness as a long-term strategy



The record rise in grain and food prices in recent years is not a mere Wall Street profit gimmick, although obscene profits are being made. Rather, it is apparently an integral part of a long-term strategy whose roots go back to the years just after World War Two when Nelson Rockefeller and his brothers tried to organize the global food chain along the same monopoly model they had used for world oil. Food would henceforth become just another commodity like oil or tin or silver whose scarcity and price could ultimately be controlled by a small group of powerful trading insiders.



At the same time the Rockefeller brothers were expanding their global business reach from oil to agriculture in the developing world through their technology-driven Green Revolution scheme after the war, they were also financing a little-noticed project at Harvard U…

THE MANIPULATION OF THE GLOBAL FOOD SUPPLY...MANKIND MAY NEED TO LEARN TO LIVE WITHOUT OUR TRADITIONAL FOOD SOURCES...

Getting used to Life without Food
Wall Street, BP, bio-ethanol and the death of millions

by F. William Engdahl



Global Research, July 3, 2011










My late grandfather, a man of sturdy Norwegian-American farm stock, who later became a newspaper editor and political activist during the First World War, used to say, 'A man can get used to pretty much anything with time, except dying...and even that with some practice.' Well, as fate has it, it seems we, the vast majority of the human race, are about to test that adage in regard to the availability of our daily bread itself.

Food is one of those funny things it's hard to live without. We all tend to take it for granted that our local supermarket will continue to offer whatever we wish, in abundance, at affordable prices or nearly so. Yet living without adequate food is the growing prospect facing hundreds of millions, if not billions, of us over the coming years.

In a sense it's a genuine paradox. Our planet has everything we need to…