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MEXICAN NARCO WITH TIES TO TEXAS BORDER & SINALOA MANGO COUNTRY AWAITS MULTIPLE TRIALS IN USA...AFTER MEXICO TRIES HIM FIRST...

'La Barbie' may not be tried in U.S. soon

By JASON BUCH Copyright 2011 Houston Chronicle
Aug. 3, 2011, 2:43PM




Daniel Aguilar Getty Images

Edgar "La Barbie" Valdez Villarreal is shown to the press during a news conference at the federal police center August 31, 2010 in Mexico City, Mexico. Valdez, a Texas-born drug smuggler and leader in the Beltran Leyva cartel, was captured Monday by Mexican authorities in a residential area near Mexico City.








It could be awhile before the accused Texas-born drug trafficker known as "La Barbie" will face charges in the U.S.




The attorney for Edgar Valdez Villarreal, a 38-year-old U.S. citizen from Laredo, said his client was expected to come to the U.S. for his drug trafficking charges, then be returned to Mexico. 


But a Tuesday announcement by the Mexico’s attorney general that the government there will pursue charges of organized crime, kidnapping and arms possession against Valdez means the U.S. may have to wait its turn.


Valdez …

THE BLOOM TO FRUIT SET CYCLE OF THE KEITT MANGO CAPTURED BY PHOTOGRAPHY

11/22/99 For the entire mango season I had marked 10 panicles to follow their growth.  The ones seen below were the most successful and produced one mature Keitt mango.  The other 9 did not do as well producing very small fruit that cracked and fell off.

© Ian Maguire/UF TREC


© Ian Maguire/UF TREC

© Ian Maguire/UF TREC


© Ian Maguire/UF TREC


© Ian Maguire/UF TREC

© Ian Maguire/UF TREC







http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/tfphotos/112299.htm



PAKISTAN HAS SITES SET ON SEA CONTAINER SHIPMENTS TO USA...

Thursday, August 04, 2011



Pak striving for mango export to USA through sea


LAHORE: Pakistan is striving for mango export to the USA through sea route to enhance its share from the current 150,000 tonnes being transported through air.


Pakistan Horticulture Development and Export Company (PHDEC) chief executive officer (CEO) Bashir Hussain said the freight charges was Rs 300 per kilogramme (kg) while the ship fare was only Rs 25 per kg, which would help enhance the trade volume to many proportion as the US has already permitted Pakistani exporters to send the mango fruit.



“In this way, we will be able to capture most of the portion of the total US mango import of 650,000 tonnes,” he added.

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2011%5C08%5C04%5Cstory_4-8-2011_pg10_2


INTERESTING COMPARISONS ON MANGO BLOOM AND FRUIT SET AROUND THE WORLD...

Blooming and Pollination


Mango trees less than 10 years old may flower and fruit regularly every year. 

Thereafter, most mangos tend toward alternate, or biennial, bearing. A great deal of research has been done on this problem which may involve the entire tree or only a portion of the branches. Branches that fruit one year may rest the next, while branches on the other side of the tree will bear.

Blooming is strongly affected by weather, dryness stimulating flowering and rainy weather discouraging it. 

In most of India, flowering occurs in December and January; in northern India, in January and February or as late as March. 

There are some varieties called “Baramasi” that flower and fruit irregularly throughout the year. 

The cultivar ‘Sam Ru Du’ of Thailand bears 3 crops a year–in January, June and October. 
In the drier islands of the Lesser Antilles, there are mango trees that flower and fruit more or less continuously all year around but never heavily at any time. 

Some of these are cu…

OCEAN CARGO SUPPLY EXCEEDS DEMAND...SHOULD BE A "SHIPPERS MARKET" THIS SEASON...

Ocean cargo capacity exceeds demand

In the past several weeks, shippers had told LM that the demand for ocean transportation services had been declining, leading them to believe that a “peak season” might not even arrive

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 03, 2011



Shipper demand for ocean carrier capacity has failed to match the rise in supply during a slack peak season, said industry analysts.

According the Paris-based consultancy, Alphaliner, the active (non-idle) containership capacity has risen by 10 percent over the last twelve months, but the main trade lane’s modest second-quarter capacity utilization levels of below 90 percent are expected to rise only moderately in August. This comes in spite of the recent capacity withdrawals undertaken by some carriers.

In the past several weeks, shippers had told LM that the demand for ocean transportation services had been declining, leading them to believe that a “peak season” might not even arrive.

“The freight rate trends do not …

NORTHERN TRADE ROUTES OPEN UP FROM ASIA TO THE WEST AS RECORD ICE MELTS AROUND ARCTIC CIRCLE...RUSSIA HOPES TO COMPETE WITH SUEZ CANAL...

Russia says high ice melt opens Arctic trade routes





MOSCOW | Wed Aug 3, 2011 5:41pm EDT



(Reuters) - Arctic ice cover receded to near record lows this summer, opening elusive northern trade routes from Asia to the West, Russia's climate research agency said on Wednesday.


After the third hottest year on record since 1936 in the Arctic last year, ice cover has melted as much as 56 percent more than average across northern shipping routes, making navigation in the perilous waters "very easy," it said.



"Since the beginning of August icebreaker-free sailing is open on almost all the routes," the climate monitoring agency said on its website www.meteoinfo.ru.

It added that the mild conditions would last through September on shipping lanes that are tens of thousands of kilometers shorter than southern alternatives.

With retreating ice opening new strategic trade routes, Russia hopes to make Arctic passage a competitor to the Suez Canal, profiting from taxes and the lease of …

WHAT THE DEBT DEAL HAS IN STORE FOR THE USA ECONOMY...

What will debt-ceiling deal do to the fragile US economy?


The political deal to raise the debt ceiling averted a fiscal crisis, but a big question remains: Will the cuts in spending help or harm the economic recovery? So far the markets are unimpressed.




A trader watches his screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Tuesday. The S&P 500 turned negative for the year on Tuesday as the wrangling over the US debt ceiling faded and investors turned their attention to the stalling economy.

Brendan McDermid/ReutersEnlarge




By Mark Trumbull, Staff writer / August 2, 2011


A political compromise has averted a fiscal crisis, but now another challenge looms as large as ever: how to get the economy growing and creating new jobs...

Some economists warn that the newly passed debt deal, by cutting federal spending, will damage an already fragile recovery from recession. Others see the deal as good news for jobs – that reducing the size of government will help revive the spirits of the pri…

HARITHA DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION (INDIA) URGES THE BAN OF HORMONE SPRAY...CITING LONGTERM HARMFUL EFFECTS ON MANGO TREES...

NEWS » STATES » KERALA                                                                       PALAKKAD, August 3, 2011



Demand to ban hormone treatment of mango trees


                                                                                                                  STAFF REPORTER



The Haritha Development Association, an environmental organisation, has urged the government to ban the use of hormone spray in the mango trees of Muthalamada, known as the Mango City of the State for its commercial production and export of the fruits.

Association president Arumughan Pathichira in a statement has said that chemicals are sprayed in the mango trees for artificial flowering which is harmful to the trees and the fruits. Spraying of the hormone in the mango orchards will also affect the flowering cycle of other plants and trees in the area, he said.


The hormone is sprayed from July to August in Muthalamada. 

The chemical will affect the health of the mango tree and reduce its life span b…

THE WAY WE LOOK AT DNA IS ABOUT TO CHANGE...AS FOURTH SEQUENCE IS CHALLENGED...

Published online 3 August 2011 | Nature 476, 20-21 (2011) | doi:10.1038/476020a

News Feature
The challenge of microbial diversity: Out on a limb

From giant viruses to unexplained marine DNA, there may be more to the tree of life than the three domains currently defined.

Gwyneth Dickey Zakaib


The e-mail arrived two weeks after Jonathan Eisen's paper was published. Tongue-in-cheek, it read: "Welcome to the 'Fourth Domain' club." Eisen, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Davis, chuckled. His paper1, which came out in March, hinted at bizarre new forms of microscopic life in the ocean. The e-mail was from Didier Raoult, a biologist at the University of the Mediterranean in Marseilles, France, who for years has argued that the colossal viruses he has identified belong to a unique, hitherto unknown, branch of life: the fourth domain.

Raoult believes that this domain branched off from the very base of life's evolutionary tree — a declaration…

NEW FACES APPEAR AS "CASH FLUSH PORT OPERATORS" STEP INTO DEVELOPING MARKETS

Entrants Challenge Old Guard Terminal Operators
Bruce Barnard | Aug 3, 2011 2:51PM GMT                                                                         The Journal of Commerce Online - News Story

Financially strong companies, mainly in Asia, look to developing countries



Several financially strong companies, mainly in Asia, are poised to break into the global container terminal market, challenging the established operators that dominate the industry, according to a new report.



“The appetite for investing in the container terminals business has returned strongly,” said Neil Davidson, Senior Advisor, Ports at Drewry Shipping Consultants in London, which published the report.

There is evidence of increased merger and acquisition activity and signs of renewed interest in bidding for greenfield sites, according to the “Global Container Terminal Operators 2011” report.

Investment Insight: Investors Favor Ports in Africa, Latin America and India



“Several strong companies are mounting seriou…

AS GO THE GLACIERS...SO TO...GOES A WAY OF LIFE...ENJOY THEM WHILE YOU CAN...THE EARTH'S GLACIERS ARE MELTING AWAY...

Twilight of the Glaciers

Djamila Grossman for The New York Times

A century and a half ago there were 150 glaciers in what is now Glacier National Park. Twenty-five remain.


By STEPHEN P. NASH
Published: July 29, 2011



AN hour or so up ahead, at the higher elevations along the trail that leads over Siyeh Pass, huckleberries were ripening. Even a dawdling day hiker like me knows that huckleberries can quickly mean grizzlies in Glacier National Park. I indulged a nervous tic and patted around for the loud red aerosol can on my belt, whose label reads Counter Assault. It’s effective as a bear repellent, but even more reliable at making an urbanite feel faintly ridiculous.



Montana’s Fading Glaciers


Glacier National Park




I was in northwest Montana for the hikes and the huckleberries, but most of all to experience the namesake glaciers, which, I had recently learned, might be around for only another decade or so. Given that a century and a half ago there were 150 and now there are 25, the trip m…

CROP SELECTION...CRITICAL COMPONENT...SLASHING CO2 LEVELS IS POSSIBLE...IF WE CHOSE PROPERLY...MANGO TREES AT TOP OF THE LIST AS BEST CHOICE...

Crop breeding could 'slash CO2 levels'


August 3, 2011



Writing in the journal Annals of Botany, Professor Douglas Kell argues that developing crops that produce roots more deeply in the ground could harvest more carbon from the air, and make crops more drought resistant, while dramatically reducing carbon levels.

In principle, any crops could be treated in this way, giving more productive yields while also being better for the environment.

Although the amount of carbon presently sequestered in the soil in the natural environment and using existing crops and grasses has been known for some time, Professor Kell's new analysis is the first to reveal the benefits to the environment that might come from breeding novel crops with root traits designed to enhance carbon sequestration.

Professor Kell, Professor of Bioanalytical Science at the University as well as Chief Executive of the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), has also devised a carbon calcula…

AS MANGO SEASON COMES TO AN END...SOUTHWEST FLORIDA TURNS TO CANNED PRODUCTS...TO RAISE MONEY FOR LOCAL HISTORICAL SOCIETY...

Jamming along: Estero Historical Society’s annual mango chutney and jam sale aims to help open new headquarters


By LAURA GATES
Posted August 3, 2011 at 6 a.m.




Nancy Stewart and Jill Keene help label jars of mango jam as Marlene Fernandez cooks in the kitchen of her Estero home. The ladies of the Estero Historical Society are hard at work making jam and chutney to sell for their annual fundraiser. Laura Gates/ Banner Correspondent



Marlene Fernandez stands in a bedroom of her Estero home which is dedicated to ripening mangoes. "You need a dark area to ripen mangoes," she says. Laura Gates/ Banner Correspondent


The Estero Historical Society is selling Mango Chutney Meat Sauce and Mango Jam, available in varying sizes, from We're Hair For You salon in Estero. The society is raising funds to renovate a historical home for the society's headquarters. Laura Gates/ Banner Correspondent


ESTERO — As the late summer sun blazes over Southwest Florida, Marlene Fernandez’s kitchen heat…

OXFAM SHOWS VIA INTERACTIVE MAP...JUST WHAT A GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS LOOKS LIKE...