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El nuevo Bolívar no se parece a sus estatuas (Fotos) ...

julio 24, 2012 3:16 pm










Ya Venezuela conoce el rostro de Simón Bolívar, desvelado hoy en el Palacio de Miraflores y luego de numerosos estudios científicos e históricos se logró recrear el rostro de Bolívar de una manera que algunos catalogan de “Bastante aproximada”.




(foto cortesía simonbolivar.gob.ve)




Pero ahora el Bolívar idealizado en cientos de estatuas emplazadas en todo el planeta al parecer no concuerdan mucho con los nuevos rasgos del Libertador.

¿Se reescribirá la historia?



Galería







http://www.lapatilla.com/site/2012/07/24/el-nuevo-bolivar-no-se-parece-a-sus-estatuas-fotos/



A CHAVEZ LE IMPORTA LOS VERDADEROS DESEOS DEL LIBERTADOR ???

MIT STUDY REVEALS: Certain USA Airports Are Disease-Spread Hotspots

MIT researchers used real traveler patterns, geographical information and airport waiting times to predict what U.S. airports are most likely to spread an epidemic from its origin. Katherine Harmon reports.


July 24, 2012



The security lines at JFK and LAX can be horrendous. But these airports have something in common worse than the gripes of jaded travelers. 



A new study finds that they, along with Honolulu International Airport, are the most likely to facilitate the spread of a major pandemic.


Researchers at MIT used real traveler patterns, geographical information and airport waiting times to predict what U.S. airports are most likely to spread an epidemic from its origin. The findings are reported in the journal Public Library of Science ONE. [Christos Nicolaides et al, A Metric of Influential Spreading during Contagion Dynamics through the Air Transportation Network]





The surprise is that the key airports are not necessarily the largest or busiest.




Previous research had focused on how eas…

STRATFOR: 16 Maps Of Drug Flow Into The United States ...

Michael Kelley | Jul. 8, 2012, 10:15 AM | 84,888 | 23


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STRATFOR







Despite growing momentum for drug policy reform in Latin America, continual carnage in Mexico and a U.S. government-sponsored study that rips U.S. drug policy, America's 40-year war on drugs is still raging.


This week retired Colombian police Gen. Mauricio Santoyo turned himself in to the DEA on charges that he helped drug gangs and right-wing paramilitaries smuggle cocaine to Mexico and the U.S. while he was the head of security for the president of Colombia.



We've covered how cocaine gets from the fields in Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia to the world's largest drug market.






The U.N.'s World Drug Report 2012 showed us how the U.S. has high demand for marijuana, cocaine and painkillers. Ironically, the more America spends on the drug war, the cheaper drugs become.





All this got us thinking about how drugs make it from Latin America to American cities, so we put together a series of maps to get a …

MEXICO BY THE NUMBERS: Why The Mexican Drug War Should Keep You Awake At Night ...

Michael Kelley



Jun. 18, 2012, 2:36 PM |





Justice Department

The largest cash seizure in history




Felipe Calderon sent 50,000 soldiers after the drug cartels when he became president of Mexico in 2006.



So far the offensive to root out top drug traffickers, combined with conflicts between cartels over territory, has claimed more than 55,000 lives.






Here are some more numbers — drawn from reports including in-depth pieces by Reuters and the New York Times — that show just how scary the conflict is:




• 3,000 police officers and soldiers have died since 2006, which is equal to the number of coalition soldiers who have died in Afghanistan since 2001.

• An additional 5,000 people have disappeared since 2006.

• The Zeta cartel, which now controls more territory than any other cartel in Mexico, commands 10,000 gunman stretching from the Texas border to Central America.

• 49 corpses were decapitated, dismembered and dumped on a highway in northern Mexico last month. One of the worst atrocities of the drug…

Portugal Decriminalized All Drugs Eleven Years Ago And The Results Are Staggering ...

Samuel Blackstone


| Jul. 17, 2012, 9:37 AM



AP Photo/ Paulo Duarte






On July 1st, 2001, Portugal decriminalized every imaginable drug, from marijuana, to cocaine, to heroin. Some thought Lisbon would become a drug tourist haven, others predicted usage rates among youths to surge.



Eleven years later, it turns out they were both wrong.




Over a decade has passed since Portugal changed its philosophy from labeling drug users as criminals to labeling them as people affected by a disease. This time lapse has allowed statistics to develop and in time, has made Portugal an example to follow.






First, some clarification.



Portugal's move to decriminalize does not mean people can carry around, use, and sell drugs free from police interference.



 That would be legalization. 



Rather, all drugs are "decriminalized," meaning drug possession, distribution, and use is still illegal. While distribution and trafficking is still a criminal offense, possession and use is moved out of criminal courts and in…

TOTAPURI MANGOES: Coca-Cola, Jain Irrigation project looks to scale up AP mango yields ...

OUR BUREAU


Demo plot: Farmer, Mr S. Bhaskarachari of Chittoor district, Andhra Pradesh, stands in front of his freshly planted field of Totapuri saplings.







CHENNAI, JULY 24:





Mr S. Bhaskarachari, a farmer in Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh, surveys his freshly planted field with satisfaction.

The saplings of the Totapuri variety of mango are neatly laid out in the rich, red soil, the tubes of the drip irrigation system snaking through the field.

Around 670 saplings have been planted on the one acre farmland at an investment of Rs 80,000.





Mr Bhaskarachari will need to invest around Rs 1.75 lakh over four years.

He has reason to be pleased.







YIELD PERIOD


The mango trees will start yielding from the third year and he can expect to make Rs 20,000 an acre and when the trees are in full bloom by the fifth year, up to Rs 1.2 lakh an acre.





Mr Bhaskarachari’s small farm of around four acres is one of the demo plots adopted by Project Unnati, a Coca-Cola and Jain Irrigation initiative to increase mango…

BANGLADESH: Newly developed haribhanga wins hearts of connoisseurs ...

Impressive as well as tasty, ripe haribhanga mangoes adorn a tree in Rangpur.

Photo: STAR


Mehedy Hasan, Rangpur










A recently developed variety of high quality mango, locally called haribhanga, has appeared as more appetizing than traditional popular varieties like langra, fazli and amropali in the markets in Rangpur.




Introduced about 12 years ago by Abdus Salam Sarkar, a retired government official, at Podaganj village under Mithapukur upazila of Rangpur district, haribhnaga now sees large-scale cultivation in Mithapukur, Badarganj, Pirganj and Sadar upazilas in Rangpur district as well as other areas of the northern region, the Department of Agriculture Extension (DAE) sources said.





Around 30 thousand people of Badarganj and Mithapukur upazilas are directly dependent on the cultivation and trading of the highly fleshy, fibreless and tasty variety mango.





Traders from Dhaka, Rajshahi, Barisal, Khulna and Sylhet are thronging the local markets to buy haribhanga from here.










This season this variet…

STRATFOR ANALYSIS for July 24, 2012: Consequences of the Fall of the Syrian Regime ...

July 24, 2012 | 0900 GMT





Stratfor

By George Friedman







We have entered the endgame in Syria


That doesn't mean that we have reached the end by any means, but it does mean that the precondition has been met for the fall of the regime of Syrian President Bashar al Assad. 

We have argued that so long as the military and security apparatus remain intact and effective, the regime could endure. Although they continue to function, neither appears intact any longer; their control of key areas such as Damascus and Aleppo is in doubt, and the reliability of their personnel, given defections, is no longer certain. 


We had thought that there was a reasonable chance of the al Assad regime surviving completely. 

That is no longer the case. 


At a certain point -- in our view, after the defection of a Syrian pilot June 21 and then the defection of the Tlass clan -- key members of the regime began to recalculate the probability of survival and their interests. The regime has not unraveled, but it is unrave…

OCEAN CARGO: Burning MSC Ship Being Towed to Port ...

Joseph Bonney, Senior Editor 

| Jul 23, 2012 2:57PM GMT



The Journal of Commerce Online - News Story








Salvage efforts could take weeks, owner says






Firefighters continue to battle a fire on the MSC Flaminia as the abandoned container ship is being towed from the mid-Atlantic toward Europe.

Reederei NSB, the ship’s German owner, said firefighting efforts could take weeks.





The ship was being towed to port by Fairmount Marine’s firefighting tug Fairmount Expedition while another firefighting tug, the Anglian Sovereign, sprayed water on the fire. A third firefighting tug also was on hand.




A party of four salvage specialists managed to reactivate the MSC Flaminia’s firefighting system, which was being used to cool the area in front of the ship’s superstructure. The superstructure and engine room reportedly were not damaged.





Reederei NSB said the ship was listing by eight to 10 degrees because of the water poured on the fire and the damaged cargo.





The vessel’s owner said the ship’s holds 4, 5 and 6 wer…

INDIA: Coca-Cola and Jain Irrigation’s sustainable agriculture initiative Project Unnati to reach 50,000 farmers ...

Monday, July 23, 2012












Chittoor: Project Unnati, a sustainable agriculture initiative by Coca-Cola and Jain Irrigation, accomplished its first milestone today with the announcement of a specialized farmer training program and the establishment of 100 demo farms in the pilot phase to train over 50,000 farmers over five years. 



The program will use specialized buses with in-built classrooms to provide on-the-go training in Ultra High Density Plantation (UHDP) techniques in mango farming which can help farmers double their mango yields and thus significantly improve their livelihood. 


The first phase of the project has an investment outlay of more than USD 2 million, shared equally between Coca-Cola and Jain Irrigation. 



The farmer training bus, aptly called the Unnati Mobile Classroom, was flagged off today by Gen Ved Malik (retd), former - Chief of India Army, Mr. T Krishnakumar, CEO, Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages, District Collector of Chittoor Shri S. Soloman Arokiaraj and Mr. Anil Jai…