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Showing posts from October 13, 2012

Arkansas-based Tyson to audit treatment of animals ...

JEANNIE NUSS


Published: Yesterday



FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2006, file photo, a car passes in front of a Tyson Foods Inc., sign at Tyson headquarters in Springdale, Ark. The nation's largest meat company on Friday, Oct. 12, 2012, says it's launching an animal treatment audit of suppliers' farms. The news comes as animal welfare activists have been pressuring Tyson to move away from cramped cages for pregnant pigs. (AP Photo/April L. Brown, File)








LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - The nation's largest meat company, Tyson Foods Inc., announced Friday that it will do an animal treatment audit of suppliers' farms.



The news comes as animal welfare activists have been pressuring Tyson to move away from cramped cages for pregnant pigs, but the Springdale, Ark.-based company said its latest move is not in response to actions from the Humane Society of the United States or other organizations.







"We know more consumers want assurance their food is being produced responsibly, and we think…

CALIFORNIA'S PROP 37: Vote for the Dinner Party ....

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/14/magazine/why-californias-proposition-37-should-matter-to-anyone-who-cares-about-food.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0








Is this the year that the food movement finally enters politics?




By MICHAEL POLLAN
Published October 10, 2012 









One of the more interesting things we will learn on Nov. 6 is whether or not there is a “food movement” in America worthy of the name — that is, an organized force in our politics capable of demanding change in the food system. 





People like me throw the term around loosely, partly because we sense the gathering of such a force, and partly (to be honest) to help wish it into being by sheer dint of repetition. 



Clearly there is growing sentiment in favor of reforming American agriculture and interest in questions about where our food comes from and how it was produced. And certainly we can see an alternative food economy rising around us: local and organic agriculture is growing far faster than the food market as a whole. 




But a market and …