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GUYANA: Twenty-one kgs cocaine found in mangoes shipment at airport ...

By STABROEK EDITOR



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012















At about 0330h today, acting on information received, ranks of the Police Narcotics Branch at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport, Timehri conducted a search among a quantity of boxes of mangoes consigned for shipment to Canada and found cocaine.




A total of 21 kilograms 874 grams of cocaine were found concealed in macaroni boxes which were among the mangoes, police said.







Four men have been arrested and are in police custody assisting with the investigations.






http://www.stabroeknews.com/2012/news/stories/12/06/twenty-one-kgs-cocaine-found-in-mangoes-shipment-at-airport/

477 dead, homeless swell after Philippines typhoon ...

by Staff Writers


New Bataan, Philippines (AFP) Dec 6, 2012





UN offers to mobilize help for Philippine storm victims



United Nations (AFP) Dec 6, 2012 - The United Nations on Thursday offered to mobilize international support for the Philippines after a major typhoon left at least 477 dead.

"The United Nations stands ready to provide humanitarian assistance and to mobilize international support for the response," Ban's spokesman Martin Nesirky said.

Nesirky said UN leader Ban Ki-moon had sent "sincere condolences" to the Philippine government over Typhoon Bopha, which hit Mindanao island on Tuesday leaving the hundreds of dead and at least 250,000 homeless.

Philippine rebels offer truce in storm-hit areas
Manila (AFP) Dec 6, 2012 - Philippine communist guerrillas offered to suspend attacks in typhoon-hit areas Thursday, as the military led efforts to look for hundreds of missing from a disaster that claimed nearly 500 lives.

"In light of the urgent humanitarian consi…

SYRIA: Al Assad's Last Stand ...

December 6, 2012 | 1000 GMT







Stratfor

By Omar Lamrani






The battle for Damascus is raging with increasing intensity while rebels continue to make substantial advances in Syria's north and east. 





Every new air base, city or town that falls to the rebels further underlines that Bashar al Assad's writ over the country is shrinking. It is no longer possible to accurately depict al Assad as the ruler of Syria. 



At this point, he is merely the head of a large and powerful armed force, albeit one that still controls a significant portion of the country.






The nature of the conflict has changed significantly since it began nearly two years ago. The rebels initially operated with meager resources and equipment, but bolstered by defections, some outside support and their demographic advantage, they have managed to gain ground on what was previously a far superior enemy.



 Even the regime's qualitative superiority in equipment is fast eroding as the rebels start to frequently utilize main battle …

AUSTRALIA: New ripening technology gets produce market ready faster

Researchers at the University of Queensland have developed a revolutionary new approach to fruit ripening. A research team has developed a way in which to encapsulate ethylene gas into powder. Just a small amount of the resultant product is capable of ripening large quantities of fruit during transit, shortening the time produce spends in the supply chain and reducing costs. 




Currently certain fruits have to be sent for ripening after transit, the current price of which, in Australia, is in the region of $1-3 per carton.





"Late last year researchers used less than 100g of this powder to control ripen 20 tonnes of mangoes during a three day transit from Darwin to Adelaide," says Cameron Turner, of UniQuest, a University of Queensland commercial venture.






This meant that the mangoes were ripe and ready for sale 6 days in advance of those that not ripened in transit.


University of Queensland researchers Mr Binh Ho and Professor Bhesh Bhandari






Cameron says the product has four princi…

Maersk Line after port strike: It could take 80 days to get back on track ...

http://shippingwatch.dk/secure/English_Version/article4936692.ece#ixzz2EJJMJZ6V





ENGLISH VERSION: 



Maersk Line expects to use between seven and ten days per day of strike to get back to the regular operating schedule. 


This means it could take 50 to 80 days, says Maersk Line's Head of Communications in North America, Timothy R. Simpson, to ShippingWatch.




Al Assad estudia la posibilidad de pedir asilo político en Venezuela, según diario israelí ...

diciembre 5, 2012 11:40 am









Chávez entrega a Assad una réplica de la espada de Bolívar, en Caracas en junio de 2010








El presidente sirio, Bashar Al Assad, estudia la posibilidad de pedir asilo político para él, su familia y sus allegados en algún país de América Latina, en el caso de que se viera obligado a huir de Damasco. 



El viceministro sirio de Exteriores, Faisal al-Miqdad, mantuvo la semana pasada reuniones en Cuba, Venezuela y Ecuador, y entregó a los líderes locales cartas clasificadas escritas personalmente por Assad, informa el diario israelí «Haaretz», publica abc.es.






El periódico, que explica que no ha podido averiguar cuál fue la respuesta de las autoridades venezolanas, indica que el ministro de Exteriores venezolano confirmó a «El Universal» que al-Miqdad llevó consigo una carta para el presidente Chávez. Éste la habría recibido antes de partir hacia Cuba para seguir su tratamiento.







Las fuentes consultadas por «Haaretz» en Caracas sí indicaron que el mensaje de Assad «aludía a…

AUSTRALIA: Katherine mango growers trying to avoid fruit fly sprays ...

By Steven Schubert

Thursday, 06/12/2012



A massive experiment in the Northern Territory is trying to prove the mango industry in the Katherine region can control fruit fly without any sprays or other treatments.




At the moment, several interstate and international markets require either sprays or irradiation treatment, which can only be done in Queensland, and both methods are time consuming and costly for growers and can also affect fruit quality.







Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries entomologist Austin McLennan says over two years his team have cut open 40,000 mangoes, and found only 13 with fruit fly larvae inside.








"The aim is to see if we do certain things, like if we pick the fruit at a certain stage and have certain quality control procedures in place, we want to see if without doing any treatments at all, we can send fruit away without fruit flies in them."







Katherine Research Station entomologist Austin McLennan and his many mangoes. (Steven Schubert)



http://www.abc.ne…