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Showing posts from May 13, 2014

Climate change in Haiti: Investing in mangoes instead of coffee?

12 May, 2014 by Stefanie Neno






With approximately 80% of its population living on less than US$2 a day, Haiti is the poorest country in the Americas.




The major earthquake that struck the country in 2010 seriously damaged the economy, especially its agriculture, which contributes 25% to the gross domestic product (GDP) and employs almost 58% of the labor force.



As if this were not enough, the same year, a hurricane caused major damage to infrastructure and crops and, in 2012, a series of extreme weather events – including drought, the tropical storm Isaac, and hurricane Sandy – further cut into agricultural output and slowed economic growth.




Haiti’s high exposure to climate risks is obvious. Besides, models predict an average temperature increase of 1.8°C by 2050, a jump in the temperature of the hottest month from 30.9°C to 32.9°C, and a 10% decline in rainfall during the driest month. Understanding the impacts of climate change on the production of Haiti’s high-value crops is therefore im…

ACCOUNTABILITY & TRACEABILITY : DO FARMERS KNOW WHAT LURKS IN THE SOIL ???

The future of traceability begins and ends with soil nutrition. Ultimately, this will define and diferentaite one farmer's piece of fruit from another.
Technology exists to compare trace elements (That ultimately come from the soil that Agricultural Commodities are grown in).



Soil remediation is part of the solution...






Articles in English Arsenic hyperaccumulationResearchers Genetically Alter Plants Hoping They'll Vacuum Up ToxinsNovel approaches to cleaning up polluted soilsFrom Green to Clean 
Use of plant roots for phytoremediation and molecular farmingA Citizen's Guide to PhytoremediationPhytoremediation and Indoor Air Quality:  Plants Clean the AirHuman consequences of toxin exposureArsenic hyperaccumulation in ferns: a review
The Chinese Ladder fern Pteris vittata, also known as the brake fern, is a highly efficient accumulator of arsenic.  P. vittatagrows rapidly and can absorb up to 2% of its weight in arsenic.  It can extract arsenic from soil even where the level is lo…